Category Archives: Winnipeg

Yarn – Jan-Feb 2024

24-Yarn_0102-JanFeb So, we’re into 2024 already, and The Yarn is right there, along for the ride with you.

The January-February edition is available now, and here is the Editorial to get you started:

Happy new year, Yarn readers! And it’s not just a new year, it’s also the Club’s 75th! That’s quite an achievement for a little outpost here in the middle of North America, eh?! Talk about the “Aussie/Kiwi battler” – the DUCW exemplifies just such a character. And this little Southern Yarn gazette plays a not so insignificant part in the battle to stay alive and relevant ‘midst the constant bombardment of alt-media’s missiles, mortar and manipulations.

So, if you value these 8 pages in your inbox or mailbox every couple of months, please heed Catherine’s renewal reminder (p.1). Where else does one find such concise and concentrated downunder content? This edition, again, is a typical example – there’s Club and member news, book reviews, bird views, OZ and NZ news – you choose.

Since there likely would not be a DUCW if it weren’t for the BCATP, it gets another prominent mention (p.6). The humble but joyful little canary gets the honour of first bird “viewed” this year (p.8).

Huge thanks again to Jenny, Peter, Judy, Catherine, advertisers, Brian, et al.

Haka Rugby is coming to Winnipeg

Haka Rugby is once again hosting its Elite 2-Day Camp right here in Winnipeg on Thursday July 27 and Friday July 28 from 10:00 am to 3:00 pm at Assassins Rugby Football Club, Maple Grove Rugby Park, 190 Frobisher Rd.

The goal is to use rugby and Māori culture as a tool to  develop future world leaders.

To register, go to https://hakarugbyglobal.wildapricot.org/event-5257925/Registration or connect locally with Caleb Stick at https://www.facebook.com/caleb.stick

Feel free to share this with anyone you think might be interested in participating.

 

Yarn May June 2023

The Southern YarnSpring has sprung,
The sun is ris,
I wonder where the birdies is…

They will no doubt be flocking through soon, mostly on their way further north. Thankfully some regulars have stayed around through the winter months – chickadees and nuthatches – and visit our feeders daily.

We took a walk through Kings Park a couple of weeks ago and saw a fleet of pelicans on the river (more than 100). Some were perched on bits of remaining ice. Further along the track, Judy was buzzed by a cheeky chickadee. Luckily, she had come prepared with some black sunflower seeds in her pocket and was soon treated to that unique pleasure of having them feed from her hand. Birds I view this issue is about wood ducks (p.8).

Continue reading

Southern Yarn for March-April, 2023

The March-April edition of The Southern Yarn is once again available for your enjoyment. 

To get you started, here is Charlie’s editorial:

A couple of bits came my way for this issue that triggered some nostalgia.

Regular Yarn readers will already know that I have a soft spot for Australian bird life, and I’ve been known to eagerly play a YouTube video of a kookaburra laughing or a lyrebird doing imitations for Canuck friends who had a more deprived upbringing. However, in addition to Vegemite, there are many other enjoyable reminders of “home”, such as hearing the ABC Radio News theme music – fair dinkum! Growing up in the ’50s the radio was it for news, entertainment and serials. Continue reading

Yarn January-February 2023

The first issue of The Southern Yarn is available now, online and in colour, and will be making its way through the post to those still having our postal version in glorious B&W on yellow paper.

Here’s Charlie’s editorial to get you started:

With this first edition for 2023 it is probably worth another reminder of the origins of the DUCW – namely, a bunch of Kiwi and Aussie servicemen wanting to socialize together after making it through WWII and choosing to make Winnipeg their home. This newsletter evolved later, and while sadly those founding vets have all passed on, we try to maintain a nod to their contribution by consistently including an article or something with a military theme – serious or otherwise. So, on p.6, in “Getting to know” there is a piece of history that was news to me until I read of it in the Australian Geographic. The focus is on the secret diamonds, but the bigger picture is the bombing of Broome, WA (I had only heard of the attack on Darwin). It is good to note that the AG journalist rightly acknowledged the critical role of the (Indigenous) Nyal Nyal man who first made contact with the survivors and raised the alarm – as opposed to the Mission Brother, who gets the credit in other accounts.

There are other contributions by my usual collaborators — Jenny, Peter and Judy — and I am particularly grateful this month to Jude McCudden (observations of changes downunder, p.2) and Ed Powell (guest Birds I View observer/writer, p.8). Hopefully they will inspire more of you readers to send in news or links to stories of interest to others. Special thanks, as always, to our advertisers, and Brian Hydesmith who assembles this into its presentable format. Continue reading