Welcome!

G’day and Kia ora to all Kiwis and Aussies
in Manitoba and beyond!

Welcome to the Down Under Club of Winnipeg. We’re a social club based far, far from our original homes and hold regular events for members and guests. We also produce a monthly newsletter about connections in our new community and all things happening down under. Go on, explore our site and consider joining our group. Hooroo, mates!

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Did you know …

Australia is one of the top travel destinations in the world, and rightfully so. On January 26, we celebrate Australia’s diversity, rich history and culture, and breathtaking landscapes.

Did you know…

  • Australia has unique flora and fauna that cannot be found anywhere in the world; 90% of the animals are unique to Australia
  • There are 60 wine regions in Australia
  • Australia is the only continent in the world without an active volcano
  • One of the most famous drives in the world, The Great Ocean Road, is dedicated as a memorial to those who died fighting in World War I
  • Australia’s Indigenous people have lived on the continent for more than 65,000 years
  • 90% of Australia’s animals cannot be found anywhere else
  • Australia is home to the world’s largest reef ecosystem
  • Fraser Island in Queensland is the world’s largest sand island

Courtesy of Downunder Travel Calgary

Yarn January-February 2023

The first issue of The Southern Yarn is available now, online and in colour, and will be making its way through the post to those still having our postal version in glorious B&W on yellow paper.

Here’s Charlie’s editorial to get you started:

With this first edition for 2023 it is probably worth another reminder of the origins of the DUCW – namely, a bunch of Kiwi and Aussie servicemen wanting to socialize together after making it through WWII and choosing to make Winnipeg their home. This newsletter evolved later, and while sadly those founding vets have all passed on, we try to maintain a nod to their contribution by consistently including an article or something with a military theme – serious or otherwise. So, on p.6, in “Getting to know” there is a piece of history that was news to me until I read of it in the Australian Geographic. The focus is on the secret diamonds, but the bigger picture is the bombing of Broome, WA (I had only heard of the attack on Darwin). It is good to note that the AG journalist rightly acknowledged the critical role of the (Indigenous) Nyal Nyal man who first made contact with the survivors and raised the alarm – as opposed to the Mission Brother, who gets the credit in other accounts.

There are other contributions by my usual collaborators — Jenny, Peter and Judy — and I am particularly grateful this month to Jude McCudden (observations of changes downunder, p.2) and Ed Powell (guest Birds I View observer/writer, p.8). Hopefully they will inspire more of you readers to send in news or links to stories of interest to others. Special thanks, as always, to our advertisers, and Brian Hydesmith who assembles this into its presentable format. Continue reading

Southern Yarn October – December 2022

The Southern Yarn is available for you to download.

You can click on the image to the right or you can check out the Yarns page here: The Southern Yarn.

Here’s Charlie’s editorial to get you started:

It’s a beautiful Manitoba autumn – leaves changing to all shades of green, yellow and red; geese honking overhead; harvests in and gardens put to bed; returning songbirds singing to be fed. It has been fun enjoying in-person club events once again – the pool party, golf tournament, brunch – and more to come, as per the calendar.

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The Southern Yarn August – September 2022

The latest version of The Southern Yarn is ready for you now, Check it out. And here is the editorial to get you started.

As I put this issue together, Folklorama is about to begin its 2-week run here in Winnipeg. Being the first time back, after COVID*, there are only 12 pavilions each week – about half of the usual number. Perhaps a post-COVID strategy on the part of the Folk Arts Council, or just a reality of the times – like our DUCW, members are few and sadly volunteers can no longer muster the oomph to plan and execute such a major undertaking. At least we have fond memories of our glory days. So we try to keep something of our history and culture alive as best we can – not least by this our Yarn. Read on and you will learn of a saint and a sinner, sand and scrabble, as well as more about Vegemite and cricket. Continue reading