Welcome!

G’day and Kia ora to all Kiwis and Aussies
in Manitoba and beyond!

Welcome to the Down Under Club of Winnipeg. We’re a social club based far, far from our original homes and hold regular events for members and guests. We also produce a monthly newsletter about connections in our new community and all things happening down under. Go on, explore our site and consider joining our group. Hooroo, mates!

Continue reading

Yarn July August 2024

The Southern Yarn for July-August 2024

24-Yarn_0708-JulyAug The Southern Yarn for July August is complete and posted here for your enjoyment. 

Here is the editorial to get you started:

I’m a bit too old and unfit for cricket these days, but there was a time when I, along with other younger and fitter fellow DUCW members, played and enjoyed the game at a competitive level. In the winter we played (and won the championship) indoors (with a tennis ball) and in the summer we played at Assiniboine Park. We had to stake out the boundary and peg a large mat down for the pitch. So, it is good to learn that an upgrade is in the works (see p.5) since there are now so many new Canadians, particularly from South Asia, who also want to continue enjoying their traditional sport.

With the Paris Olympics about to start, we will no doubt soon be cheering on and celebrating new heroes. Australia’s and New Zealand’s first Olympians get a mention on p. 4.

There is also more of our Club history (see p.6), thanks to Jenny Gates and our bird this month is the oriole. Thanks again to all our sponsors, contributors and advertisers.

Charlie

Yarn for May-June 2024

The Southern Yarn is once again ready for your reading pleasure. There is lots to say, but instead, let’s whet your appetite with Charlie’s editorial, and you can dig in directly from there. All from the little club newsletter than could…

Following on from last issue’s reminisces of school army cadet days: the quiz answer is the Bren gun.

When we went bush on weekend bivouacs we had to take army-issue rations with us – canned stew, condensed milk, “dog” biscuits, tubes of Vegemite, etc. At the annual two-week camp, regular army cooks served up the meals in mess tents. The fun times thankfully balanced the more serious implications of what the cadet movement was all about.

In addition to rifle practice and learning maneuver strategies, our participation in the annual ANZAC Day parades and ceremonies kept the more sober realities front of mind. For 75 years our DUCW has maintained the serious remembrance of the ANZACs and their sacrifices and achievements, especially for each next generation.

We also maintain the balance with the many lighter activities. And there is more humour in uniform in this edition. You can also learn more of what “the little club that could” has gotten up to in part 2 of Jenny Gates’ Club history piece on p. 7 – pretty amazing!

All this and so much more – thanks to all who have contributed and our advertisers. 

Southern Yarn March 2024

Southern Yarn, March-April 2024

When we commemorate ANZAC Day this year (Saturday, April 27, at the Scandinavian Cultural Center) it will mark the start of the Down Under Club’s 75 year anniversary – see Jenny’s article on this milestone (p. 6). Jenny is mining the archives and will bring further installments of DUCW history in future Yarns. Continue reading

Yarn – Jan-Feb 2024

24-Yarn_0102-JanFeb So, we’re into 2024 already, and The Yarn is right there, along for the ride with you.

The January-February edition is available now, and here is the Editorial to get you started:

Happy new year, Yarn readers! And it’s not just a new year, it’s also the Club’s 75th! That’s quite an achievement for a little outpost here in the middle of North America, eh?! Talk about the “Aussie/Kiwi battler” – the DUCW exemplifies just such a character. And this little Southern Yarn gazette plays a not so insignificant part in the battle to stay alive and relevant ‘midst the constant bombardment of alt-media’s missiles, mortar and manipulations.

So, if you value these 8 pages in your inbox or mailbox every couple of months, please heed Catherine’s renewal reminder (p.1). Where else does one find such concise and concentrated downunder content? This edition, again, is a typical example – there’s Club and member news, book reviews, bird views, OZ and NZ news – you choose.

Since there likely would not be a DUCW if it weren’t for the BCATP, it gets another prominent mention (p.6). The humble but joyful little canary gets the honour of first bird “viewed” this year (p.8).

Huge thanks again to Jenny, Peter, Judy, Catherine, advertisers, Brian, et al.

The Southern Yarn – Nov December 2023

23-Yarn_1112-NovDec Nov-Dec 2023 Yarn

The November December issue of The Southern Yarn is available online now, in full colour with links to source and extended content. It will also be in the post this week, in its glorious goldenrod analog paper edition, for those who still anticipate delivery in their letter boxes. 

To get you started, here is the editorial: 

On 20 September, 1939, Prime Minister Robert Menzies announced to Parliament that Australia was offering the British Government an expeditionary force to bolster the Royal Air Force as it expanded for World War II.

Apart from a force headquarters, the offer comprised 1 Fighter Wing Headquarters with Nos 7 and 15 Squadrons; 2 Bomber Wing Headquarters with Nos 1 and 8 Squadrons; 3 Bomber Wing Headquarters with Nos 16 and 17 Squadrons; and an Air Stores Park, a Medical Receiving Station, a Base Area Headquarters and a Base Depot. The number of personnel required to service this force totalled 3,200 officers and personnel, including a reinforcement pool of 225. Continue reading